Sign In

close
OR
Forgot your password?

Wed, Oct 25

Matt Mitchell plays Tim Berne - FØRAGE

The Western Front
$25

Time 8:00 pm

 

Buy Tickets

 
 

Pianist Matt Mitchell has made a solo piano recording (his first) of compositions by Tim Berne, his longtime leader in Snakeoil. It is in every sense a masterpiece.Popmatters.com

The compositions of iconic saxophonist/bandleader Tim Berne have earned renown for their intensely kinetic, exceedingly intricate quality, as performed around the world by his various groups over the past four decades. With førage (Screwgun) listeners have a chance to experience Berne’s music as never before, in versions for solo piano. Virtuoso pianist Matt Mitchell (Dave Douglas, John Hollenbeck) has explored the full range of the composer’s songbook. He devises mash-ups of multiple compositions, improvises new angles off the music, and often slows it down to reveal heretofore hidden beauties—limpid harmonies and ruminative melodies.

There is an incisive, unpretentious grandeur here, declares JazzTimes. This is a creative love affair between Berne and Mitchell, inspiring idiosyncratic, genuinely collaborative music that feels heaven-sent.

With two short opening sets by solo musicians John Paton saxophone and James Meger bass.

 

 
 

Wed, Oct 25

Matt Mitchell plays Tim Berne - FØRAGE

The Western Front
$25

Time 8:00 pm

 

Buy Tickets

Pianist Matt Mitchell has made a solo piano recording (his first) of compositions by Tim Berne, his longtime leader in Snakeoil. It is in every sense a masterpiece.Popmatters.com

The compositions of iconic saxophonist/bandleader Tim Berne have earned renown for their intensely kinetic, exceedingly intricate quality, as performed around the world by his various groups over the past four decades. With førage (Screwgun) listeners have a chance to experience Berne’s music as never before, in versions for solo piano. Virtuoso pianist Matt Mitchell (Dave Douglas, John Hollenbeck) has explored the full range of the composer’s songbook. He devises mash-ups of multiple compositions, improvises new angles off the music, and often slows it down to reveal heretofore hidden beauties—limpid harmonies and ruminative melodies.

There is an incisive, unpretentious grandeur here, declares JazzTimes. This is a creative love affair between Berne and Mitchell, inspiring idiosyncratic, genuinely collaborative music that feels heaven-sent.

With two short opening sets by solo musicians John Paton saxophone and James Meger bass.